Why Pilots Can’t Take Viagra Within Six Hours Of A Flight

Shortly after Viagra’s release in 1998, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a warning urging pilots not to take the blue pill within six hours of a flight.

But it’s not for the reason we all of us think.

Many users of Viagra reported a change in the way they distinguish blue and green colors or they see the world more… bluish. This happens because except from PDE5, Viagra also blocks PDE6; the enzyme that’s used in the retina’s cone cells. This may not be a problem for most of the people but for pilots, being able to recognize blue from green instrument panels and runway lights is quite essential. As stated by Dr. Donato Borolo in a Federal Air Surgeon’s Medical Bulletin edition: (the article continues after the ad)

“Although only 3 percent of all patients report visual disturbances, this blue-green impairment could be dangerous. The correct identification by the pilot of blue and green is necessary for safe flight. In addition, the use of color video terminal displays has increased in aviation and may present a problem in the color-deficient pilot.”

But this is not the only problem.

Sexual intercourse while in flight is not condoned by the FAA, but is known to occur. When Viagra is used by a pilot who suffers from cardiac disease, sexual intercourse at 5,000 feet could result in death.

Thankfully, up until today, there are no recorded accidents that have been attributed to the blue bill and let’s hope it stays that way.

If you like what you read, then you will definitely love this one: Why Pilots Use The Word ‘Mayday’ When In Emergency? 


Photo: Creative CommonsViagra Generico
Photoshop: I’m A Useless Info Junkie
Sources: How Viagra Works | FAA To Pilots: Don’t Fly Viagra